Keystone XL pipeline to be approved

Syncrude's Mildred Lake mine site and plant near Fort McMurray, Alberta

WASHINGTON, March 01, 2013 – The Obama administration today took the next potential step toward approval of the 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline, despite the heavy toll the pipeline and its oil will take on the climate crisis, wildlife and the environment. Some 50,000 people protested outside the White House last month in opposition to the pipeline. Today’s announcement came in the form of a supplemental environmental impact statement on Keystone XL. “If President Obama is serious about confronting the deepening climate crisis, he needs to take Keystone XL off the…

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Canada Continues to Align Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measures with the United States

Air pollution in Canada

“New measures will allow fuel savings of up to $8000 per year, per vehicle, by 2018.” Mississauga, Ont. / February 25, 2013 – Today the Honourable Peter Kent, Canada’s Environment Minister, announced final regulations to improve fuel efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from new on-road heavy-duty vehicles and engines. This is another step in our plan to align our environmental regulations with the United States. “With these tough new measures, GHG emissions from 2018 model-year heavy-duty vehicles will be reduced by up to 23 per cent,” said Minister…

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Obama Administration Finalizes Polar Bear Extinction Plan

Polar bear on Arctic ice, threatened by climate change and habitat loss

New Rule Shrugs Off Dire Climate Threat to Ice-dependent Animals WASHINGTON / February 19, 2013 — After months of high-profile statements about climate change, the Obama administration today finalized a special rule that fails to protect polar bears from greenhouse gas pollution under the Endangered Species Act. The new regulation is modeled on a previous Bush-administration measure excluding activities occurring outside the polar bear’s habitat — such as carbon emissions from coal plants — from regulations that could slow Arctic warming to prevent the bear’s extinction. “The president’s failure to…

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Endangered Species Act Protection proposed for Wolverine threatened by the loss of Spring Snowpack from Climate Change

PORTLAND, Ore. / February 1, 2013 — In accordance with a historic agreement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed Endangered Species Act protections for American wolverines in the contiguous United States. The fierce, solitary hunters once roamed a large swath of the mountainous West, from Colorado to the Sierra Nevada in California and north through Washington and Montana. Today they are limited to Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and a single animal in California. Their dependence on persistent spring snowpack for denning makes…

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Greenland’s Ice Cores Analysis adds to Historical Record and may provide Glimpse into the Future of Climate

January 25, 2013 – The International North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) project results indicate that melting of Antarctic ice sheet may have contributed to sea level rise more than melting of the Greenland ice sheet some 100,000 years ago. A new study that provides surprising details on changes in Earth’s climate from more than 100,000 years ago indicates that the last interglacial (the period between “ice ages”) was warmer than previously thought and may be a good analog for future climate, as greenhouse gases increase in the atmosphere and…

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Coca-Cola and WWF announced new Arctic Home campaign to raise awareness and funds to support Polar Bear habitat

17 Jan 2013 – Coca‑Cola and WWF have joined forces to launch Arctic Home, a new project focused on raising awareness and funds to help conserve the home of the polar bear and create a positive future for the Arctic. Launching on 17th January, Arctic Home will use WWF’s extensive scientific network and conservation expertise along with Coca‑Cola’s marketing experience and resources to bring the plight of the polar bear closer to home for millions of consumers. The polar bear has been a long-standing icon across Coca‑Cola advertising for 90…

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Portions of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are warming twice as fast as previously thought

Study findings could have important implications for global sea-level rise December 24, 2012 – A new study funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) finds that the western part of the massive West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is experiencing nearly twice as much warming as previously thought. The findings were published online this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. NSF manages the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP) and coordinates all U.S. research and associated logistics on the southernmost continent and in the surrounding Southern Ocean. The temperature record from Byrd Station,…

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Two Arctic Ice Seals Gain Endangered Species Act Protection Due To Climate Change

First Species Since Polar Bear Listed Primarily Because of Climate Change SAN FRANCISCO / December 22, 2012 — Responding to a 2008 petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the federal government yesterday finalized Endangered Species Act protection for two ice-dependent Arctic seals threatened by melting sea ice and snowpack due to climate change. Ringed seals and bearded seals, found in the waters off Alaska, are the first species since polar bears to be protected primarily because of climate change threats. “Arctic animals face a clear danger of extinction from…

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Households and industry responsible for half of EU greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels

Copenhagen, December 20, 2012 – Households and industry in the EU each cause approximately a quarter of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new report by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The two sectors were largely responsible for the emissions increase in 2010, together leading to an additional 90 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent compared to 2009. The results in the EEA report are based on the official 2012 greenhouse gas inventory submissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and energy balance data reported to…

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UMass Amherst Climate Model is first to study Climate Effects of Arctic Hurricanes

AMHERST, Mass. / December 17, 2012 – Though it seems like an oxymoron, Arctic hurricanes happen, complete with a central “eye,” extreme low barometric pressure and towering 30-foot waves that can sink small ships and coat metal platforms with thick ice, threatening oil and gas exploration. Now climate scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and in England report the first conclusive evidence that Arctic hurricanes, also known as polar lows, play a significant role in driving ocean water circulation and climate. Results point to potentially cooler conditions in Europe…

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