Kauai, Hawaii, Joins National Call for Urgent Action on Climate Change

County Urges EPA to Use Clean Air Act to Cut Greenhouse Gas Pollution LIHUE, Hawaii / November 15 — Kauai has joined more than 40 other U.S. communities in calling on President Barack Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency to use the Clean Air Act to cut greenhouse gas pollution that is raising the risk of extreme weather events and worsening climate change. The Kauai County Council passed a resolution Wednesday, joining a broad range of cities such as Detroit, Nashville and Salt Lake City as part of the Center…

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Questionable future water resource availability addressed at American Geophysical Union conference

November 15, 2012 – Water covers some 70 percent of the Earth’s surface. Despite being so abundant in the past, the question that is being asked recently by many scientists is how long will water be readily available to nourish life on Earth? The answers may be fount at the the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), held in San Francisco from Dec. 3-7, 2012 where scientists funded by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) program will meet to address water…

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Suit Filed Against Wyoming’s KILL‐AT‐WILL Wolf Policy

Removal of Federal Protection Is Hampering Recovery of Iconic Endangered Species Bozeman, Mont. / November 13 – Conservation groups filed suit today challenging the federal government’s elimination of Endangered Species Act protections for Wyoming wolves. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service turned wolf management in Wyoming over to state officials this fall even though the state’s wolf‐management policies promote unlimited wolf killing in a “predator” zone that extends throughout most of the state and provides inadequate protection for wolves even where killing is regulated. The state policies will result in wolf deaths that undermine the…

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Endangered Mountain gorilla population grows slightly since 2010

November 15 – According to the survey from Ugandan Wildlife Authority, carried out in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, the total number of the critically endangered Mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) has risen to 880. This number represents an increase of more than 10% in relation to the previous estimates of 786 individuals from only two years ago. Mountain gorilla lives in only two locations in the world – Uganada’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park and the Virunga Massif area, which spans parts of Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and Rwanda.…

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Climate change threatens Giant Pandas’ bamboo source and survival

November 14, 2012 – China’s endangered wild pandas may soon need new food source, based on models that indicate climate change may kill off swaths of bamboo that pandas need to survive. In this week’s Nature Climate Change, an international journal, scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences provide comprehensive forecasts of how changing climate may affect the most common species of bamboo that carpet the forest floors of prime panda habitat in northwestern China. Even the most optimistic scenarios show that bamboo die-offs would effectively cause…

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Pennsylvanian Heller Cave Springtail One Step Closer to Endangered Species Protection

Catherine Township, PA /November 13 — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that it will protect the Heller Cave springtail (Typhlogastrura helleri), a tiny creature native only to a central Pennsylvania cave system which has recently been threatened by a proposed limestone quarry. The decision is a response to the petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and Juniata Valley Audubon Society which sought the springtail’s protection under the federal Endangered Species Act in October 2011. “The Heller Cave springtail will disappear forever if its only home on the planet is…

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Students from Yale University found a solution for plastic breakdown in the Amazon rainforest!

Amazon is known to be home for more species than nearly anywhere else on Earth. On the other hand, amounts of plastic mankind produces, disposes of and lays to waste on landfills or in the nature is growing day by day and it has become a worldwide problem. Amazing discovery – a group of scientists from Yale University, led by their molecular biochemistry professor Scott Strobel, discovered a fungus in the jungles of Equador which can eat plastic! Bottles, shoes, food packaging, children toys, or any other polyurethane substance, simply…

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Rhino horn smuggler sentenced to 40 years in prison in South Africa

November 11 – Just two days ago, WWF reported that a man charged with illegal trading of rhino horns in South Africa was pleaded guilty for this felony and sentenced to 40 years behind the bars by the Johannesburg’s Kempton Park Magistrate’s Court. This is the harshest sentence given for a wildlife crime in the country to-date. Chumlong Lemtongthai, a Thai national, was accused for running syndicate which used white rhino trophy hunts as a cover to illegally export rhino horns to Asian black market for commercial use. The syndicate used…

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International Trade Protection Sought for U.S. Turtles

Washington, November 9 — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that it will propose three species of U.S. freshwater turtles for protection at the next meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in Thailand in 2013. Today’s announcement responds to a 2011 petition submitted by the Center for Biological Diversity that asked the Service to help end the destructive international trade in American freshwater turtles. Millions of wild freshwater turtles are caught in the United States every year and…

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Drought in 2001-2002 fueled Pine Beetle outbreak in Southern Rocky Mountains into epidemic

November 5, 2012 – Results of a new study show that episodes of reduced precipitation in the Southern Rocky Mountains, especially during the 2001-2002 drought, greatly accelerated a rise in numbers of mountain pine beetles. The overabundance is a threat to regional forests. The research is the first to chart the evolution of the current pine beetle epidemic in the southern Rocky Mountains. It compared patterns of beetle outbreaks in the two primary host species, the ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine, said University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder) researcher Teresa…

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